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Aspiranet is a 501(c) (3), California nonprofit organization with the mission of providing children, youth, and families with a foundation of support and services so they can succeed at home, at school, and in their communities. Tax ID: 94-2442955


Watch Angel's Story To Learn More

Nobody Succeeds Alone.

For teens and youth in the foster care system, dreams for their future can seem far away. When you become a foster family for a teen, you not only provide hope, you help shape the future.

Aspiranet guides and supports foster families through every step of the foster care process. We connect children, youth and young adults with safe, caring relationships that can last a lifetime. 

With over 50,000 children and youth in the foster care system in California, we need your help more than ever. One of the most urgent needs comes from teens who make up about a quarter of those in the foster care system. Fostering teens and youth can be challenging, but the rewards are far-reaching. The difference you make in a foster teen’s life can have a powerful and lifelong impact on their future.

The need for foster care in California has never been greater. Aspiranet specializes in matching youth in foster care with loving homes and families that will help them grow, flourish and thrive. Become a foster family! Send us an email through the form above or call 877-380-4376.

Get started: (877) 380-4376

Angel's Story - A Foster Teen on Probation

“My parents weren’t in the picture at an early age. My father was incarcerated when I was around three. I didn’t have my mother around at all, she left me at about a year old. I was lucky enough to have my grandparents take custody of me.”

After Angel relocated to Modesto he found himself getting into trouble trying to stay busy. “As much as my grandparents tried to teach me good values I was pretty hard headed.”

At the age of 11 Angel landed in juvenile hall. “Hearing the judge tell me I was going to be put in temporary placement.  Those words didn’t register as foster care or not being around people you know or what you call home.”

When social workers told Angel it was time to leave juvenile hall the first thing he asked was if he was going home.  “She said no you’re not going home. You’re going to come live out in another town with another family and I just burst into tears. That’s what scared me.”

It took Angel time to accept the transition to a foster home. “I did not like authority coming out of juvenile hall.  I did not trust adults at all. And for the first time when I realized my social workers, my foster family, people that helped mentor me were not out to get me, it was like a weight was lifted off of me.”

“In a way I felt like it was a gift. I would not have matured the way that I did. And I would not have qualified for these programs that got me a job and got me through school. It made me realize that every time I elevate or do something good it is very important to bring someone else up because if they hadn’t done that for me I don’t know where I would have been today.”

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